How to Petition for a Stop Sign

by Contributor

Maybe your knuckles clench on the steering wheel every time you drive through an intersection. You wonder for the millionth time why no one is putting in a stop sign, Don't assume that the powers that be in your village or city know about the dangers. It often takes someone like you to open their eyes and get action. Read on to learn more.

Begin your petition by writing a statement. This is a summary of your grievances, written in paragraph form. Explain the neighborhood's concerns about the intersection.

Leave blank lines underneath the statement for signatures and addresses. Print or photocopy several copies.

Determine how long you'll be running the petition campaign for a stop sign. Plan to end the campaign with enough time for you to gather the information together and present it at the next town or city council meeting.

Distribute the petitions to neighbors who want to help with the petition drive. Plan times to go door to door in the area. Also consider speaking to local churches, civic groups and neighborhood watch committees.

Consider creating a petition online. There is a website that allows you to post public petitions, free of charge. It explains step by step how to do it.

Plan your presentation. Decide who will be speaking. Pick someone who can talk passionately, but still stay on task. If there's someone who's been involved in an accident because of the lack of stop sign, have them give their personal pleas, as well.

Bring the completed petition to a town or city council meeting with your stop sign petition in hand. Either ask in advance to be put on the agenda or sign up on the sheet in the back of the room. This will get you the opportunity to speak during the public portion of the meeting.

Tip

  • check If nothing's being done on a local level, contact your state representatives. This includes senators and assemblymen. Follow up with phone calls.

Warning

  • close Get permission first, if you're planning to set up a petition table outside local businesses.

Items you will need

About the Author

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