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How to Trace a Moped Title

by Salvatore Jackson

A Vehicle Identification Number, or VIN, is a 17-digit identification number engraved on all motor vehicles, including mopeds. No two VIN numbers are alike. When registering a moped title, the state agency responsible for registering motor vehicles requires the individual registering the moped to provide the moped's VIN. Because every moped has a unique VIN, it is possible to trace the title of a moped by searching for the moped's VIN. Most state vehicle titling agencies do not provide this service to the public, requiring individuals to use a VIN search services provided by federal agencies, such as the National Insurance Crime Bureau, or private companies such as CarFax.

Find the VIN for your moped. On most mopeds, the VIN is located in one of three locations: above the footrest, inside the sundries box or on the main support. If your moped's VIN is located above the footrest, most manufacturers place a metal plate on it to protect and obscure it. If this is the case, you will need a screwdriver to unscrew the plate to view the VIN.

Navigate to the website of a VIN search service. Some organizations, such as the VinCheck service from the National Insurance Crime Bureau, offer a free VIN checking service that will tell you whether your moped has been previously reported stolen or declared as a salvage vehicle. Another service, CarFax, will provide additional information about your moped, including the title history, for free of charge.

Enter your moped's VIN and pay any appropriate fees. Your 17-digit VIN will not contain the letters I, O or Q. Follow the on-screen directions for entering your VIN and obtaining a report about the prior ownership of your moped.

About the Author

Salvatore Jackson began writing professionally in 2010. He has experience with international travel, computers, sports and law. Jackson is a licensed attorney with experience in legal research. He received his Juris Doctor from Tulane University in 2010.

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