How to Repair a Slashed Tire

by David Montoya

Flat tires aren't just a car problem that will keep you on the side of the road. Moreover, under-inflated tires caused by a slash can cause a serious accident. The low air pressure in a slashed tire will add too much stress to the tire's structure and could cause the tire to burst while driving. If you have a slash in your tire, fix it as soon as possible. A little effort today will prevent a huge problem in the future.

Lift your car with a jack so the slashed tire is elevated off the floor. Place the jack closer to the slashed tire than any other tire.

Remove the slashed tire with the lug nut wrench.

Use a sponge to apply water and soap to your tire if you can't immediately find the slash. A small slash might be hard to see but will cause soapy water to bubble because of the air escaping from the slash. Rub the soapy water all over your tire in case there are multiple slashes.

Use a tire buffer to buff the slashed area. This will prepare the area for the vulcanized liquid and tire patch.

Apply the vulcanized liquid to the small slash, and let it dry.

Fill the tire with air according to the air pressure specifications on the side of the tire.

Place the tire patch on over the vulcanized liquid. Make sure the patch is completely flat, and let the patch sit for at least 5 minutes. Then put the tire back on your car.

Tip

  • check Have a mechanic check your patch work. A professional mechanic will be the best judge on how well you were able to repair the slash.

Warnings

  • close Some slashes are too big to repair. Take your car to a tire shop, and buy a new tire if the slash is too large for patch work.
  • close Do not attempt to fix slashes on the side wall of the tire. These can't be safely repaired, and you will have to replace your tire.

Items you will need

About the Author

David Montoya is an attorney who graduated from the UCLA School of Law. He also holds a Master of Arts in American Indian studies. Montoya's writings often cover legal topics such as contract law, estate law, family law and business.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera tire image by Orlando Florin Rosu from Fotolia.com