Thinking about purchasing a new car? Use our new Car Loan Calculator to estimate your monthly car payment!

How to Troubleshoot a Lincoln Ignition Switch

by Patrick Nelson

Engine starting, electrical and accessory circuits, the steering wheel and the gearshift lock are all controlled by the ignition switch on Ford Lincoln vehicles. The ignition switch is operated using a key, which provides a measure of security by preventing the car from being started and driven away by an unauthorized person. Problems with the ignition switch can be related to the switch itself, the position of the key, or starting with the computer-assisted cranking system. These various issues can be corrected through troubleshooting.

Insert the key in the ignition lock and turn it clockwise through the four positions if the ignition switch doesn't seem to be working right. The first position is the "Off" position and is the starting position when you inserted the key. Moving the key to the second position will activate the accessory circuit, which will allow devices like the radio to function. Moving the key to the next click is the "On" position. This position activates all of the electrical circuits. Moving the key to the fourth position starts the engine.

Move the gearshift to the "P" or "Park" position if the engine won't crank when you turn the key to the fourth position on the ignition switch.

Turn off all lights and accessories if the lights dim and the engine cranks slowly when you turn the key to the fourth position. This suggests a problem with a low battery charge and is rather common on older cars. It does not indicate a problem with the switch. Have the battery replaced at the earliest opportunity.off all lights and accessories if the lights dim and the engine cranks slowly when you turn the key to the fourth position. This suggests a problem with a low battery charge and is rather common on older cars. It does not indicate with the switch. Have the battery replaced at the earliest opportunity.

Release the key when the engine begins to crank and allow it to spring back from the fourth position to the third position ("On"). The cranking is computer-assisted and can continue for up to 10 seconds after you release the key. This is normal.

About the Author

Patrick Nelson has been a professional writer since 1992. He was editor and publisher of the music industry trade publication "Producer Report" and has written for a number of technology blogs. Nelson studied design at Hornsey Art School.

More Articles

Photo Credits

  • George Doyle/Stockbyte/Getty Images