How to Reset Keyless Remote Transmitters

by Paul Dohrman

You may have purchased a new keyless-entry remote-control fob for your car. You'll need to program your car's computer to recognize the fob's signal. You can do this yourself to avoid paying the approximately $100 fee the dealership charges. Unfortunately, a wide variety of program instructions exists for cars with keyless entry capability. For example, Chevrolet has no fewer than 16 sets of instructions across models and model years, and none of them are interchangeable with each other.

Look in your car owner's manual for the instructions, if you still have it. The keyless programming instructions may be in there. If not, go on to the next step.

Visit the site programyourremote.com. This repository of around three dozen car makes has hundreds of pages of keyless remote programming instructions, broken down by model and model year. Navigation of the site is self-explanatory. If you can't find your exact model-year combination, a similar combination might work. Otherwise, go to the next step.

Visit the site ownersmanualsource.com to try to find your car's manual. Again, this site's navigation is self-explanatory and manuals are grouped by make, model and model year. If you can't find it, or it doesn't have the programming instructions in it, go to the next step.

Call around to various dealerships as a last resort, to see if a dealer will give you the instructions for free. A dealer not located in your area has less incentive to draw you into the store for a programming, so they may the ones more likely to give you the instructions over the phone.

Tip

  • check If the above doesn't work out and you want to search the Internet for instructions, good keywords are "keyless," "program" and the model of your car.

Warning

  • close Not all cars with remote entry allow the car owner to do the programming. Hyundai and Mercedes are examples.

About the Author

Paul Dohrman's academic background is in physics and economics. He has professional experience as an educator, mortgage consultant, and casualty actuary. His interests include development economics, technology-based charities, and angel investing.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera keyless remote image by Ray Kasprzak from Fotolia.com