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How to Replace Shocks on a Ford F150

by Chris Moore

The shock absorbers on your Ford F-150 truck are vital to the truck's suspension, absorbing the force of any bumps in the road to prevent and allowing for a smoother ride. If you feel any excessive banging while driving in the truck, there's a good chance the shocks need replacing. There is a shock absorber on each wheel and axle on the truck. Removing and replacing the shocks on the Ford's front end is slightly different than changing the rear shock absorbers.

Front Shocks

Raise the front end of the truck on jack stands and remove the wheels, loosening the lug nuts before raising the truck for easier removal.

Remove the three nuts mounting the shock's upper end to the frame - not the damper rod nut in the center. Separate the tie-rod end from the steering knuckle by loosening the lock nuts and marking the end's position on the rod

Unbolt the fasteners connecting the shock's lower end to the control arm. Remove the shock and coil assembly from the vehicle.

Install the replacement shocks on place, tighten the lower end fasteners, reconnect the tire-rod end and tighten the upper end's nuts. Replace the wheels after replacing the shocks and lower the truck.

Rear Shocks

Raise the truck's rear end on jack stands and block the front wheels. Place the stock floor jack under the axle near the shock absorber you are removing and raise it enough to balance the axle and take the load off the shock absorber.

Remove the nuts and bolts securing the shock absorber to the vehicle, starting with the lower bolt for the rear axle and then the upper bolt for the upper mounting bracket, and remove the shock absorber.

Install the replacement shock absorber in place and tighten the bolts in reverse order of removal. Lower the floor jack and jack stands after installation.

Tip

  • Given the heavy weight of the shock absorbers, it can help to have another person hold and support the shock absorber as you remove the bolts and fasteners.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Chris Moore has been contributing to eHow since 2007 and is a member of the DFW Writers' Workshop. He received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of Texas-Arlington.

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