How to Replace a Bronco Tailgate Window Motor

by Eli Laurens

The Ford Bronco SUV was designed with a rear power window in the tailgate, which uses an electric motor to operate a pane of glass. This motor can fail and require replacement, which involves removing the tailgate panel and unbolting the motor from the window regulator. The average weekend mechanic can replace this motor in about 30 minutes.

Disconnect the battery by turning the positive terminal bolt counterclockwise. Lay the terminal aside, away from the battery.

Lower the tailgate and remove the panel mounting screws by turning them in a counterclockwise direction. Some models will have a top panel that has additional bolts that can also be removed by turning them counterclockwise. The inside handle also has a screw for the surrounding molding.

Pull the panel free of the pop rivets, if applicable, by starting at a corner and firmly tugging on the panel. Some rivets may need to be replaced as they become brittle with age.

Unplug the motor from the wiring harness by pulling the adapter plug apart or out of the socket on the motor. Turn the motor's mount bolts in a counterclockwise direction and remove the motor by pulling it free of the window regulator gears. If the glass is in the way (retracted for lowering the tailgate), it can be temporarily raised by working the window regulator arms manually. Only a few inches should be required.

Replace the motor by mounting it into the window regulator, turning the mount bolts clockwise then plugging it back into the wiring harness. Lower the glass back to its original position. Replace the door panel by tapping it into each pop rivet then screwing the panel back into place. Raise the gate.

Reconnect the battery by turning the positive terminal bolt clockwise. Test the window.

Tip

  • check Check the window's fuse for a blown filament before performing this repair.

Warning

  • close Use extreme caution when working with a vehicle's electrical system.

Items you will need

About the Author

Eli Laurens is a ninth-grade physics teacher as well as a computer programmer and writer. He studied electrical engineering and architecture at Southern Polytechnic University in Marietta, Ga., and now lives in Colorado.