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The Specifications for a 1954 GMC Truck

by Marlin Quintana

The 1954 GMC line of trucks included a wide range of 1/2-, 3/4- and 1-ton configurations. The 1954 models featured several improvements over the previous model year, including a new one-piece windshield, a redesigned cargo box, a new rear bumper with a dip in the center to allow space for license plates and a color-coordinated interior.

Trim Choices

The 1954 GMC truck came with three possible wheelbases: 116, 125 1/4 and 137 inches. The 1/2-ton Series 101-24camewith the 116-inch wheelbase in a variety of styles: chassis & cowl, chassis & cab, pickup, panel truck, deluxe panel, "Canopy Express" (featuring open sides at the back) and Suburban. The Series 102-24, also a 1/2-ton truck, had a wheelbase measuring 125 1/4 inches. It came as chassis & cowl, chassis & cab, pickup and stake truck. The Series 150-24 had the same wheelbase and range of configurations in 3/4-ton guise.

The 1-ton Series 252-24 rode on the same 125 1/4-inch wheelbase, but it also came as chassis & cowl or chassis & cab only. The 137-inch wheelbase belonged to the 1-ton Series 253-24, which came as chassis & cowl, platform truck, stake rack truck, panel truck, deluxe panel and Canopy Express.

Chassis lengths ranged from 196 1/2 to 224 inches across all models.

Engine

The engine for all trucks was an overhead-valve in-line six-cylinder displacing 248.5 cubic inches (4.1 liters), with a cast-iron block, a bore diameter of 3.718 inches and a stroke length of 3.08 inches. The engine had a power rating of 125 horsepower, an increase over that of the previous year. It featured hydraulic valve lifters and a single-barrel carburetor.

Other Specs

The standard transmission was a three-speed manual synchro-mesh unit with a floor-mounted gear shifter. A four-speed manual and automatic were optional. Half-ton trucks used a semi-floating rear axle, while heavier-duty models used a full-floating design.

Options for 1954 included power steering, power brakes, two-tone paint, electric windshield wipers, heavy-duty rear springs, heavy-duty radiator, heavy-duty generator and tinted glass. Chrome grilles and bumpers were also an option. The trucks could come with various non-standard rear axle ratios.

References

About the Author

Marlin Quintana began writing professionally in 2010. A programmer and web developer, he has worked for Motorola, IBM, FameCast and his own small company, which from 1999-2002 built custom, highly interactive websites. Marlin has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in studio art and a Bachelor of Science in computer sciences, both from the University of Texas at Austin.

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