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How to Remove the Radio From the Pontiac Grand Prix

by Jule Pamplin

Your Pontiac Grand Prix undoubtedly came with a radio. If you're like many music-loving motorists, you might want to augment your Grand Prix's stock stereo system with aftermarket components that will make your system more complete. Common choices for aftermarket stereos are head units that have DVD players, Mp3 players or satellite radio receivers. Before adding a component or replacing the factory stereo deck, you will need to remove the Grand Prix's stock unit. Obtain the necessary tools and do it yourself, saving you time and the expense of a professional removal.

Raise the Pontiac's hood to gain access to the battery cables and terminals. Locate the grounding cable connecting the negative battery terminal and the frame of the Grand Prix. Using the wrench, loosen the bolt holding the cable's clamp to the terminal post. Remove the cable and secure it away from the battery. Move to the interior of the vehicle.

Remove the two screws on the panel below the steering column with the Phillips-head screwdriver. Allow the panel to hang from the bottom of the dashboard.

Grab the top of the main dash panel above the driver's instrument panel and pull it away from the dashboard. Unplug the headlamp switch wiring connector from the back of the panel and completely remove the panel.

Remove the two screws on the sides of the stereo bracket with the screwdriver. Slide the radio from the Pontiac's dashboard dock.

Disconnect the two stereo wiring connectors from the back of the radio. Unplug the antenna lead from the jack on the back of the radio.

Items you will need

About the Author

Jule Pamplin has been a copywriter for more than seven years. As a financial sales consultant, Pamplin produced sales copy for two of the largest banks in the United States. He attended Carnegie-Mellon University, winning a meritorious scholarship for the Careers in Applied Science and Technology program, and later served in the 1st Tank Battalion of the U.S. Marine Corps.

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