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How to Remove the Rear Seats on a GMC Yukon XL

by Jason Unrau

The GMC Yukon XL is equipped with a third row of seating. It is a 60-40 split bench seat, configurable for folding down to carry extra cargo or for set-up to carry extra passengers. Should you need to remove the third-row seat, it is possible with some muscle and a few tools.

Items you will need

  • Trim removal stick

  • 3/8-inch drive ratchet

  • 10-millimeter hex socket 

  • Small flat screwdriver

  • Helper

Remove Seat Frame Trim Covers

Locate the three seat frame trim covers at the front of the third row seat. They cover the three front-seat mounting bolts that you need to remove. Gently pry up on them to release the two clips on each trim piece. Use the trim-removal stick to prevent scratching or breaking the covers.

Remove the Seat-Mounting Bolts

A total of seven mounting bolts hold the third-row seat in place: Three bolts secure the front-seat mounts and four secure the rear-seat mounts. Using the 3/8-inch drive ratchet and 10-millimeter hex socket, unscrew all seven bolts by turning counterclockwise. They will be quite tight initially.

Disconnect Power Seat Connector

If equipped with a power folding third-row seat, disconnect the wiring connector to the folding seat module. If it is not equipped with power folding seat, skip to step 4.

Locate the connector at the passenger side of the seat on the module. Press the locking tab with your small flat screwdriver and pull firmly to release the connector.

Remove Seats from Vehicle

Using your helper, lift the seat out of the vehicle. Support it well, as it will come out as a bench assembly. Be careful not to scratch the interior panels with the bare metal seat mounts.

About the Author

Jason Unrau is an automotive writer with 15 years experience in the automotive dealer environment, including 10 years as and automotive service consultant. He is a Certified Technology Expert, a regular contributor to Gearheads.org, and operates AutomotiveCopywriter.com.

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