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How to Remove the Radio on a 2000 Chevy Malibu

by Leonardo R. Grabkowski

The 2000 Chevy Malibu came with a Delco factory radio. It's not an anemic stereo, but there's certainly room for improvement. If you're thinking about installing a new radio in your Malibu, you'll need to learn how to remove the old one first. The Malibu remained unchanged between 1997 and 2003, so the radio removal procedure is applicable to all first generation models. The process is also applicable to the 2004 to 2006 Malibu "Classic" model.

1

Turn the engine off and open the hood. Use your pliers to unhook the negative battery cable. This prevents damage and shock when handling the radio components.

2

Examine the area around the radio to understand the dash panel setup. The radio surround panel extends to the tip of the ashtray and to the end of the ignition cylinder. This panel must come off for the radio to be removed.

3

Insert your dash trim tool behind the radio surround panel. The best place to start is beneath the ignition cylinder. Pry the panel outward, and then work your way around it to release the clips. Once most of it is unhooked, you can pull it off with your hands. The lower portion of the panel is connected to the cigarette lighter adapter; it is not necessary to unplug this, simply move the panel to the side.

4

Remove the two Phillips head screws from either side of the radio. These screws are the only support for the radio; when they're out, slide the radio forward to pull it out of its place.

5

Disconnect the radio wiring harness on the back of the radio by squeezing the connection tabs and pulling. Unplug the antenna cable to finish.

Tip

  • If you're installing an aftermarket radio, remember to purchase the correct wiring and dash mounting kit.

Items you will need

About the Author

Leonardo R. Grabkowski has been writing professionally for more than four years. Grabkowski attended college in Oregon. He builds websites on the side and has a slight obsession with Drupal, Joomla and Wordpress.

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