How to Recycle Brake Rotors

by Nicole Vulcan

Though some newer technologies are emerging that allow manufacturers to construct brake rotors from aluminum or other materials, the most common material for brake rotors is cast iron, a metal that is fairly easy to recycle. Scrap metal recyclers may not give you a very big check when you bring in your brake rotors for recycling, but you should gain some peace of mind knowing that you've kept all that heavy metal out of the landfill.

Find a scrap metal dealer in your area. If you're not sure where to find one, check with your city or county waste management office to find out which scrap metal dealers they recommend. In most cities, you should find several scrap dealers. You can also search the website database of Earth 911 by typing in your zip code and "scrap metal" in the search boxes. Another option is to ask your local auto repair shop if they collect auto parts for recycling. Once you've found a scrap metal dealer near you, call them to find out their business hours.

Weigh your rotors to determine how much scrap metal you have. Find out how much the scrap may get you by checking the iron and steel scrap prices on a site like Scrap Metal Prices and Scrap Metal Auctions. If you want to maximize the price you get for your scrap, call around to the scrap metal dealers you found to find out how much they're paying per pound, and whether they're willing to take the amount you have.

Take your brake rotors to the scrap metal dealer of your choice. Due to metal theft laws that exist in many states, you will likely have to show your identification and fill out some paperwork to drop off the materials. In some states, you will receive a check in the mail, rather than in person, for any payment for the scrap metal.

Tip

  • check Depending on the scrap metal dealer you are working with, they may only be willing to take larger loads of materials like brake rotors. If you work in an auto shop, consider stockpiling your old rotors before you take them in for recycling.

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About the Author

Nicole Vulcan has been a journalist since 1997, covering parenting and fitness for The Oregonian, careers for CareerAddict, and travel, gardening and fitness for Black Hills Woman and other publications. Vulcan holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and journalism from the University of Minnesota. She's also a lifelong athlete and is pursuing certification as a personal trainer.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera brake image by Jan Will from Fotolia.com