How to Locate the Keyless Entry Code on Vehicles

by Contributing Writer; Updated June 12, 2017

The Vehicles is a light-duty Vehicles that allows you to haul or tow heavy loads but still use it as an everyday Vehicles. A variety of bed sizes and cab configurations were available, and Vehicles came with a full complement of convenience options, including the keyless entry system. Punching in a code into the driver's-door keypad allows you to unlock the doors without using a key. You can retrieve this code in one of three ways.

Under The Hood:

 How to Locate the Keyless Entry Code on a 2005 Lincoln Navigator

Open the front passenger side door. Locate the fuse panel cover on the right side of the passenger foot well, near the door.

Pull the cover off of the fuse panel. Locate the module label that is above and to the left of the fuse panel. The code is in large, bold numbers on the module label.

Record the number on a piece of paper for future reference. Replace the fuse panel cover. Enter the code into the keypad to test it. The doors should automatically unlock.

 How to Locate the Keyless Entry Code on a 2007 Ford F-150

Open the glove compartment, and locate the packet that contains the original factory wallet card, which has the factory keyless entry code printed on it.

Open the hood. Locate the computer module mounted on the firewall. Locate the factory keyless entry code, imprinted on a label on the outside of the computer module.

Take your truck to your Ford dealer to find out the factory keyless entry number.

 How to Locate the Keyless Entry Code on a Lincoln Town Car

Enter the five-digit factory code on the keyless entry keypad on your car door. This code can be found from the dealership or in your vehicle manual.

Press the "1/2" button within five seconds of entering the code and wait for the locks to automatically cycle.

Press any button on your keyless remote within five seconds and and wait for the locks to cycle again.

Press the "7/8" and "9/0" buttons on your keypad when you are done to end the programming sequence.

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