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How do I Remove a Rear Seat From a 2003 Chevy Cavalier?

by Harvey Birdman

Removing the rear seat is sometimes necessary if your car seats have lost their firmness or if the seat has become damaged beyond repair. The hookups are the same for the front and back seats in a 2003 Cavalier. Only basic hand tools are needed to complete this task. Finding a replacement rear seat from a Chevy Cavalier may be the hardest part of this project.

Open both rear car doors and the trunk as well since some of the bolts are easily reached via the rear.

Pry the rear kick boards off with a Flathead screwdriver to expose the rear seat attachment assembly. The kick boards are the carpeted panels that the back of your heel rests against while sitting in the rear seat. Find the seam between the carpet parts and push the tip of the flat head screwdriver into the seam and wedge the panel off. It is just attached by friction clips that will separate when pressure is applied.

Fold the rear seats down by pulling on the fold down tabs at the top rear of the car seats. Once the seats are laid down, use a hand wrench to undo the bolts at the front of the seat assembly. Go around to the rear of the car and enter through the truck. There will be a flexible carpet panel that is held by Velcro to the back of the seat, pull it off with your hands. This will expose the bolts on the rear of the seat attachment assembly.

Remove the rear bolts and push on the seat to see if it moves freely. If it does not then you missed a bolt somewhere. Once the seat moves freely you can pull the seat out via one of the side doors.

Items you will need

About the Author

Harvey Birdman has been writing since 2000 for academic assignments. He has trained in the use of LexisNexus, Westlaw and Psychnotes. He holds a Juris Doctor and a Master of Business Administration from the Chicago Kent School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts in both political science and psychology from the University of Missouri at Columbia.

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