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Woods 9000 Backhoe Specs

by Eric Benac

The Woods 9000 backhoe is a piece of construction equipment that is designed to dig large holes with its bucket. Backhoes are useful for digging out areas for swimming pools, basements, pipes and other underground installations. The specifications for the Woods 9000 are useful to know if you are considering buying this piece of equipment.

Dimensions and Weight

The Woods 9000 backhoe has a transport height of 95 inches, a transport clearance of 15 inches and a transport width of 70 inches. The loading height is 82 inches and the operating height is 150 inches. It weighs about 1,300 pounds and has a ski steer lift capacity of 1,200 pounds. Bucket sizes come in 12, 16, 18 or 24 inches. It comes in a bright yellow color that is typical of construction equipment and it has a feat that can comfortably sit one operator. It is not designed for more than one to ride on at a time. It can be placed into neutral for safety purposes.

Bucket Specs

The bucket has a working digging depth of 108 inches and a swing arch of 180 degrees. It has a digging force of 4,100 pounds. The power mode has a digging force of 5,100 pounds. The bucket cylinder diameter is about two and a half inches while the swing cylinder has a diameter of ½ inches. It has a cutting edge of 5/8 of an inch. The bucket has steel teeth that help dig into the ground easier. These teeth are Hensley top pin teeth. To avoid accidents with your backhoe, never operate the bucket near another person.

Dipperstick Specs

The dipperstick is the arm that is attached to your bucket. This controls the movements of your bucket. The dipperstick has a cylinder diameter of three inches. It has a reach from its swing pivot point of 144 inches. The swing pivot point is the point where it has extended as far as it can extend. This indicates the complete length of the dipperstick. The dipperstick has a digging force of 2,600 pounds. The dipperstick is controlled by the driver using the control levers in the driver's section. These levers control how far the dipperstick extends, how far it retracts and how deeply it digs, and can even control the movement of the bucket.

About the Author

Eric Benac began writing professionally in 2001. After working as an editor at Alpena Community College in Michigan and receiving his Associate of Journalism, he received a Bachelor of Science in English and a Master of Arts in writing from Northern Michigan University in Marquette.

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