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How to Use a 4-Wheel Drive Suzuki Grand Vitara

by Christian Killian

Driving on slippery roads or loose surfaces with your Grand Vitara is easier when using the four-wheel drive system. The Suzuki system is controlled from the dash using a rotating shift knob and allows you to select one of three different modes to improve the traction performance of the truck. You can select the mode you need to match your driving style and needs on the fly or while moving in high range. The vehicle also has a low range that will provide you more low-speed torque if the high range does not provide enough traction.

1

Lift your foot off the accelerator pedal, push in on the selector knob and rotate the selector from 4H to 4H Lock. Slowly reapply pressure to the accelerator and resume driving. The 4H Lock will provide more traction to all four wheels. If this is not enough traction, you can use 4L lock.

2

Bring the vehicle to a complete stop and shift the transmission into the neutral position. Press in on the selector and rotate it from 4H Lock to the 4L Lock position. Wait five seconds, then shift the transmission back into gear and resume driving. When 4L Lock is no longer needed, shift back to 4H Lock.

3

Stop the vehicle and shift the transmission into neutral. Press in on the selector and rotate it from 4L Lock to 4H Lock on the selector. Pause for five seconds, shift the transmission into gear and continue driving. If you no longer need the Lock position, switch back to standard mode.

4

Remove your foot from the accelerator pedal, press in on the selector knob and rotate the four-wheel drive selector from 4H Lock to 4H. Slowly reapply pressure to the accelerator and resume normal driving.

Tip

  • If it is difficult to shift between “4H” and “4H LOCK” while the vehicle is moving, try accelerating and decelerating your vehicle several times after turning the transfer switch.

Warning

  • Do not rotate the selector knob or attempt to change between modes if the tires are spinning on the vehicle. Damage to the four-wheel drive system may occur if this happens.

About the Author

Christian Killian has been a freelance journalist/photojournalist since 2006. After many years of working in auto parts and service positions, Killian decided to move into journalism full-time. He has been published in "1st Responder News" as well as in other trade magazines and newspapers in the last few years.

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Photo Credits

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