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The Specs of the Honda 305 Dream

by Michael Gunderson

The Honda 305 Dream is a vintage motorcycle that is also known as the Honda Superhawk CB77. It was one of three motorcycles first introduced by Japanese automaker Honda in 1961. The cycle is well known for its signature stamped steel forks and smooth engine. Although it is a light motorcycle, the powerful engine allows it to easily reach speeds of nearly 100 mph. The Honda Dream 305 was produced for approximately 10 years. With growth in consumer interest in larger and more powerful motorcycles, Honda decided to replace this model with one with a larger engine. Motorcycle enthusiasts still buy and trade the Dream and enjoy customizing their models with accessories such as saddlebags and windscreens.

Dimensions

The overall dimensions of the cycle are (length by width by height) 79.7 by 24.2 by 37.4 inches. It has a 51-inch wheelbase and ground clearance of 5.5 inches. The weight of the cycle is 350.5 lbs.

Engine

The Honda 305 Dream has a 305 cc, four-cycle, twin-cylinder engine. The engine is air-cooled. The piston displacement is 305cc and the bore is 2.4 inches, while the stroke is 2.1 inches. The cycle has a 14-liter fuel tank capacity. The compression ratio is 95 to 1. DH8 spark plugs are used in the Dream's engine. The maximum speed is 160 mph and the crankcase capacity is 1.2 liters. At a speed of 31 miles per hour, the stopping distance for the motorcycle is 52.5 feet.

Transmission and Starter

The transmission is a manual forward four-speed constant mesh with a multiplate clutch. The cycle has an electric starter and a kick pedal. The cycle is equipped with front and rear drum brakes.

Other Features

The colors of the original 1961 to 1964 Dream model were black, white, blue and scarlet red. It was styled with low-rise handlebars. The headlight is square with an integrated speedometer. The muffler on the Honda 305 Dream is made of polished stamped steel. The tire pump sits below the seat of the cycle. The lubrication system is a wet sump with a gear-driven pump.

About the Author

Michael Gunderson has been writing professionally since 2005. He is an independent film writer and director with several projects in the works. He has written for the comedy troupe "The Brothel" and produced his own television pilot, "Dingleberry." He has a Master of Fine Arts in screenwriting from the American Film Institute and a Bachelor of Arts in linguistics from New York University.

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