How to Replace a Mazda B2200 Fuel Pump

by Russell Wood

The fuel pump in a Mazda B2200 delivers fuel to the engine from the gas tank. When the fuel pump goes out, the gasoline in the tank has no way to get to the engine, and the truck won't be able to start. Fixing the problem involves a lot of work, including dropping the gas tank just to get to the fuel pump itself. This isn't a technically difficult process, but it can take a long time to do depending on your level of experience.

Lift up the truck using the jack and place the vehicle on four jack stands so that there is enough room underneath the truck for you to move around freely. Crawl underneath the vehicle and use the flathead screwdriver to remove the hose clamp around the connection between the gas filler neck and the gas tank.

Place the wood block onto the head of the jack. Lift up the jack until it contacts the bottom of the gas tank. Unbolt the straps holding the tank in place using the 3/8-inch ratchet, extension and sockets, then lower the tank from the vehicle with the jack. Disconnect the hose clamps holding the fuel lines to the top of the fuel pump/sending unit assembly with the flathead screwdriver and pull the gas tank out from under the truck.

Unbolt the fuel pump/sending unit from the gas tank using the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket. Unplug the wiring from the assembly and carefully pull the assembly out of the gas tank.

Pull the fuel filter off of the bottom of the fuel pump. Disconnect the hose clamp securing the fuel hose to the fuel pump and unplug any connections. Install the replacement fuel filter onto the replacement fuel pump and install them as an assembly onto the fuel hose that's on the fuel pump/sending unit.

Reinstall the fuel pump/sending unit assembly onto the gas tank, making sure to install a new rubber seal between the assembly and the tank. Reattach the fuel lines and lift the gas tank back in place with the jack. Attach the tank to the frame using the 3/8-inch ratchet, extension and sockets, then reattach the filler neck using a flathead screwdriver.

Warning

  • close Never smoke or have an open flame nearby while you're working on the fuel system of a vehicle. If you do, you risk causing a fire and damaging yourself and the vehicle.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Russell Wood is a writer and photographer who attended Arizona State University. He has been building custom cars and trucks since 1994, including several cover vehicles. In 2000 Wood started a career as a writer, and since then he has dedicated his business to writing and photographing cars and trucks, as well as helping people learn more about how vehicles work.