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How to Remove the Fuel Tank From a Dodge Grand Caravan

by Russell Wood

The fuel tank on a Dodge Grand Caravan is located under the chassis. The tank contains the gasoline supply for the engine, and it includes the fuel pump and the fuel sending unit. Since the tank sits low under the chassis, it can get damaged from an accident or a bump. If that happens, then you could lose capacity in the tank, or even lose fuel. If your gas tank is damaged, you need to remove the tank from the Grand Caravan so you can assess the damage.

Twist off the gas cap. Pop the hood and locate the Schrader valve on the fuel rail at the front of the engine. Connect the fuel pressure release hose to the Schrader valve. Put the other end of the hose into the drain pan and let the fuel drain into the pan. Remove the fuel pressure release hose from the Schrader valve.

Lift up the Grand Caravan with the jack and lower it onto a set of four jack stands. Look underneath the minivan and locate the rubber fuel filler neck running to the gas door. Unscrew the hose clamp connecting the rubber hose to the gas door, using the flat-head screwdriver.

Unplug the wiring harness from the top of the gas tank with your hand. Push together the quick-release fittings on the fuel lines leading into the gas tank with your hand, then pull the lines off the gas tank.

Position the jack beneath the center of the gas tank and lift it up until it supports the tank. Unbolt the gas tank from the chassis of the Grand Caravan with the 3/8-inch ratchet, extension and sockets.

Lower the jack carefully until you can access the fuel filler neck hose. Pull the hose off the gas tank and lower the tank to the ground. Pull the jack out from under the Grand Caravan with the tank on top of the jack. Pull the tank off the jack and away from the minivan.

Tip

  • Drive the Grand Caravan as long as possible to drain as much fuel out of the system as you can. Siphoning out the gasoline from the tank is trickier and more dangerous.

Warning

  • Never smoke or have an open flame nearby while you're working on the fuel system of a vehicle. If you do, you risk causing a fire that could injure you and damage the vehicle.

Items you will need

About the Author

Russell Wood is a writer and photographer who attended Arizona State University. He has been building custom cars and trucks since 1994, including several cover vehicles. In 2000 Wood started a career as a writer, and since then he has dedicated his business to writing and photographing cars and trucks, as well as helping people learn more about how vehicles work.

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