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How to Replace the Fuses on a Harley Road Glide

by Cassandra Tribe

If your Harley-Davidson Road Glide did not come with a manual, it can be a mystery where to find the fuse block located somewhere under all the fairing attached to the frame. The idea of just removing everything until you find the fuses is a bit daunting. Once you know where the fuse block is, you'll be surprised at how easy it is to replace the fuses on a Harley Road Glide.

1

Turn the ignition off and park the bike on the jiffy-stand. Remove the left side cover from your Road Glide. Depending on your year of Road Glide, this cover may pull off -- being held in place by tension clips -- or you may need to use a socket set to remove the small fairing bolts that hold it in place.

2

Pull the two fuse blocks out of their holder and turn them over to reveal the fuses. You need no special tool to do this, as the blocks are held in place by a tension clip only.

3

Use a blade-style fuse puller to remove the fuses. Blade-style pullers allow you to reach into the tight space between the fuses and pinch the fuse with the puller before pulling it out of the fuse block. Install the new fuses by pushing them into the block. Push the blocks back into the holder and reinstall the cover.

Tip

  • If you are replacing a fuse, test the rest of them while you have opened the access to the fuse block. Some fuse pullers are sold with a built-in tester; when it is connected to a fuse in the block, it will light up if the fuse is good. This will save you time if more fuses must be replaced.

Warning

  • Only put the correct amp fuse in the block for that particular electrical element of the Road Glide system -- consult the schematic for your year. Using the wrong fuse can lead to an electrical fire or short.

Items you will need

About the Author

Cassandra Tribe has worked in the construction field for over 17 years and has experience in a variety of mechanical, scientific, automotive and mathematical forms. She has been writing and editing for over 10 years. Her areas of interest include culture and society, automotive, computers, business, the Internet, science and structural engineering and implementation.

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