How to Remove the Speed Governor of a Honda Civic

by Christopher Michael

The speed governor in your Honda Civic is not a physical component that can be removed. Instead, it is buried inside the programming in the vehicle's ECM, or electronic control module. The ECM is a computer inside the engine compartment that controls the operation and performance specifications of the engine. To remove the speed governor in your Honda Civic, the ECM must be removed and the performance programming must be re-written by a professional.

1

Unfasten the battery cables from the car battery using an adjustable wrench. Begin with the black negative ground cable, then do the red positive feed cable.

2

Remove the battery belt. Locate two retaining bolts at either end of the belt and remove them with the appropriate socket wrench. Pull the battery belt off the battery, then use two hands to remove the battery from the engine compartment.

3

Locate the ECM. It is a large flat black panel just in front of the battery. Use a 10 millimeter socket wrench to remove the three ECM mounting bolts.

4

Remove the plastic cover with your hand. Unfasten three wiring harnesses on the back of the ECM with your fingers and remove the metal ECM panel from the vehicle. Take the ECM to a professional for reprogramming, noting the year, make, model and vehicle identification number.

5

Place the reprogrammed ECM back into its plastic mount. Insert the three wiring harnesses with your fingers and fasten the three mounting bolts with a 10 millimeter socket.

6

Replace the battery and battery strap. Use a socket to install the two battery strap retaining bolts. Install the battery cables with an adjustable wrench, starting with the black negative ground cable.

Warning

  • close Make sure the reprogrammed ECM conforms to your state's laws concerning emissions and street performance.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Christopher Michael began writing in 2010 for Break.com. He received a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Writing sports and travel articles helps support his professional baseball career, which has taken him to 49 states, five continents and four oceans.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images