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How to Remove a Buick Regal Transmission

by Cayden Conor

Buicks come with several different engines, but most of them use the same basic processes to remove the transmission. The sensors might be located in a different place, or one Buick might have cruise control while another doesn't, but for practical purposes, the actual steps for removal are the same. A transmission might need removal for rebuilding or replacing one internal part, the torque converter or the flywheel/flexplate.

Disconnect the negative battery cable and set it aside. Remove the engine cover using the appropriate sockets. Loosen the clamps on the air duct, then pull the air duct off the air cleaner box.

Label all electrical connectors and lines that are attached to the transmission. If the transmission is a 4T60-E, disconnect the vacuum line from the vacuum modulator, located on the transmission. Disconnect the transmission range selector cable from the transmission range switch. Remove the cable bracket using the appropriate socket. Set the bracket and cable aside.

Remove the transmission dipstick tube and dipstick using the appropriate socket. Unbolt the wiring harness grounds near the top of the transmission, using the appropriate socket. Remove the upper transmission bolts using the appropriate socket.

Hook the chains to the engine and hoist or use GM engine support fixture toolsJ-28467-A and J-36462 to support the engine. Jack up the Buick with the floor jack, then support it with jack stands. Remove the front wheels using the lug wrench.

Disconnect both tie rod ends from the steering knuckles. Remove the power steering gear heat shield using the appropriate sockets. Unbolt the power steering gear from the subframe and tie it to the Buick with the coat hanger or other suitable wire.

Unbolt the power steering cooler line clamps from the subframe. Remove the engine mount retaining nuts and washers using the appropriate socket. Disconnect the lower ball joints from the steering knuckles. Remove the torque converter cover using the appropriate socket. Remove the wiring from the starter. Put the nuts back on the studs, so you don't lose them.

Remove the wiring from the starter. Put the nuts back on the studs, so you don't lose them. Remove the starter retaining bolts and pull the starter off the engine. Remove the torque converter bolts through the opening made when you removed the torque converter cover.

Slide the drain pan under the transmission pan. Loosen the bolts on the transmission pan and allow the pan to slowly tip. The fluid will drain into the drain pan. Properly discard the transmission fluid. Disconnect the oil cooler hoses from the transmission using the appropriate line wrench.

Remove the CV axles. Unplug the vehicle speed sensor and wheel speed sensor wiring harness connectors. Slide a floor jack under each side of the subframe. Disconnect the transmission brace using the appropriate sockets. Remove the rest of the bolts holding the transmission onto the engine. Remove the engine-to-frame bolts holding the transmission and engine on the frame. Remove the rest of the frame-to-body bolts using the appropriate sockets. Lower the transmission and subframe assembly onto the floor jacks, then lower the floor jacks evenly. Pull the transmission and subframe from underneath the vehicle.

Tip

  • This job is easier with two people and with a hydraulic vehicle lift.

Warning

  • The torque converter will try to fall out of the transmission bellhousing. It is, at 65 pounds, very heavy, so watch your feet and fingers. Once you get the transmission away from the vehicle, tie the torque converter into the bellhousing or completely remove it.

Items you will need

About the Author

Cayden Conor has been writing since 1996. She has been published on several websites and in the winter 1996 issue of "QECE." Conor specializes in home and garden, dogs, legal, automotive and business subjects, with years of hands-on experience in these areas. She has an Associate of Science (paralegal) from Manchester Community College and studied computer science, criminology and education at University of Tampa.

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