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How to Remove the Transmission in a Geo Tracker

by Marie Mulrooney

The Geo Tracker, sometimes seen as the Chevy Tracker, is essentially a re-badged Suzuki Sidekick. Even though these light trucks are relatively small, you should still exercise appropriate caution when working underneath one: Always support the vehicle with jack stands rated to hold the vehicle's weight, wear protective goggles and gloves when working around automotive fluids and make sure that both engine and transmission are supported before you loosen or remove the transmission connectors.

Raise your Geo Tracker and support it on jack stands. Disconnect and isolate the negative battery cable.

Position a clean bucket underneath the transmission and another under the transfer case. Use a wrench to remove the drain bolt on the underside of the transmission and transfer case, and wait for the transmission fluid and gear oil to drain into the buckets.

Remove or disconnect the shift lever boots, gear shift lever, reverse light switch connector, starter motor, front and rear driveshafts, transfer case switch lever, four wheel drive switch connector, clutch slave cylinder or cable and flywheel access cover from the transmission. You also need to remove the speedometer cable and vehicle wheel speed sensor if your vehicle is equipped with them.

Support the transmission with a jack as you use your wrench to disconnect the transmission flange bolts and nuts and the transmission braces. Make sure the transmission is still firmly supported by the jack, then remove the transmission mount and crossmember.

Place the block of wood on edge underneath the rear cylinder head of the engine to support it, roughly between the distributor cap and the bulkhead. Make sure the block of wood supports the engine before you remove the transmission.

Lower the jack slowly to remove the transmission from the Geo Tracker. As you lower it, check to make sure that there are no cables, wires or plugs still connected to it.

Tip

  • Dispose of used transmission fluid and gear oil at the hazardous waste facility of your local dump. Don't try to flush these hazardous chemicals down the toilet or throw them out with the trash.

Warning

  • Never work underneath a vehicle supported by jacks. The jacks might collapse or the vehicle might roll off them, posing a risk of serious injury or death.

Items you will need

About the Author

This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Runs, contact us.

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