How Do Remote Car Starters Work?

by Traci Joy

The Benefits of Remote Starters

Remote car starters allow the driver to start their car with a remote device. This is especially beneficial in cold climates, when no one wants to go outside to turn the key to let it warm up. Not only does it warm up the engine, it also helps with cleaning the ice off the windows by warming up the bottom layer, making it easier to remove. While we know remote car starters are wonderful inventions, they prove even more fascinating when we know how they work.

How It Works

The remote electrical starter connects to the ignition assembly of the car. This assembly includes the ignition, power, starter, brake and tachometer wires. All of these wires must be connected to the starter properly for it to function correctly. When the button is pushed on the key fob, it sends a radio signal to the module. This causes an electric current, which goes through the ignition wire to start the system, just as it starts if a key were inserted. If the car has a manual transmission, no one needs to be in it to depress the clutch, as the remote signal overrides the clutch.

Progress

Remote car starters are becoming more common. Many new models of cars have the remote starter system built in. They are also becoming more advanced, as many models of remote car starters now have timers. You can set the timer to start the car several times during the night or day. This helps prevent freeze-ups in extreme temperatures. Other remote starters have a remote recognition trait, in which the starter system senses when the remote control is within a certain number of feet, causing it to start automatically.

About the Author

A certified nutritionist who majored in health, fitness and nutrition, Traci Vandermark has been writing articles in her specialty fields since 1998. Her articles have appeared both online and in print for publications such as Simple Abundance, "Catskill Country Magazine," "Birds and Blooms," "Cappers" and "Country Discoveries."

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera www.flickr.com/creativecommons