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Quicksilver Commander Control Instructions

by Dan Harkins

Mercury Marine no longer manufactures the Quicksilver Commander engine and controller, but thousands are still out on the water, doing their duties. From the Quicksilver's panel control, you can adjust your boat's trim, or angle in the water, to raise your bow to the appropriate level in various weather conditions and at different speeds. You control most of the Quicksilver Commander system from the controller arm, however, which has a throttle-only button and trailer control. You use it as you would most standard single-arm controllers.

Turn on your boat, with your Quicksilver Commander's throttle in the upright or neutral position.

Press your throttle's release button on the handle and move the control arm either one position forward or one position rearward, depending on whether you'll be going forward or in reverse.

Drive out in open water. Flip the adjustment switch on the arm of your Commander throttle from "Auto" to "Manual." Press the "Up" or "Down" button on the Commander's dash panel to adjust the trim manually. Return the switch to "Auto" to return to automatic trim function.

Press the "Trailer" button manually for assistance when hauling another boat.

Master the basics of your boat's controls, if you're just now learning how to use a standard single-arm throttle. Properly monitoring the gauges and reversing with precision with your Quicksilver Commander will take some practice and is necessary for preserving your boat and the boats of others.

Tip

  • Have a licensed captain talk you through basic boat controls. Learning how to go forward and backward is just the beginning.

About the Author

Dan Harkins has been a full-time journalist since 1997. Prior to working in the alternative press, he served as a staff writer and editor for daily publications such as the "St. Petersburg Times" and "Elyria Chronicle-Telegram." Harkins holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of South Florida.

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