How to Get a License for Golf Carts

by Andante Sostenuto

In an energy-conscious and environmentally-friendly world, golf carts are a safe and cheap alternative to cars that both children and adults can drive. There are a variety of golf carts available on the market for consumers today. The three main types are gas-powered, electric, and solar-powered.

Information

Golf cart licensing and registration varies by state. Check the local DMV office for the rules regarding the area. Most states require a valid driver's license and golf cart insurance.

Research where it is permissible for golf carts to be driven off-course. Private and public roads have their own rules. Evaluate whether or not a golf cart will be an efficient mode of transportation in the neighborhood.

Determine whether your state or city has a separate application for a golf cart license. Some areas bypass this step entirely. The application will usually be available on the city website.

Application

If necessary, renew the driver's license. Go to the DMV website. Click on the appropriate state and follow the instructions given. Make sure to have a credit card and the social security number of the owner on hand.

To insure the golf cart, call your insurance company. Golf cart insurance can be bought from sports insurance companies or extended from the home owner's policy. Liability insurance is also recommended.

Some states require a permit to drive a golf cart. Print out a form from the DMV website and fill it out. Drop it off at the local DMV office.

If the city requires a separate golf cart license, fill out the application and drop it off where appropriate. This may not always be the local DMV, but instead city hall.

Tip

  • check An alternative to a golf cart is a Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV), which is battery-powered and operates without fossil fuels. Regulations vary by state.

Warning

  • close Only drive golf carts on roads where the speed limit is 35 mph or lower.

Items you will need

About the Author

Andante Sostenuto has been writing online for three years and offline for even longer than that. Prior to working for Demand Studios, she contracted various freelance gigs from sites such as Textbroker, eCopywriters, eHow, and Helium. Sostenuto has had her work published by CFCP Inc. and Creative Communications Inc. She is currently an English major at U.C. Berkeley.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera golf carts image by Earl Robbins from Fotolia.com