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How to Replace the Oil Pan Gasket in a Ford Taurus

by Contributor; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Jack and jack stand

  • Mallet

  • Screwdriver

  • Clean shop rags or paper towels

  • Solvent

  • Replacement gasket

  • Torque wrench

  • 4.5 to 5 quarts oil

How to Replace the Oil Pan Gasket in a Ford Taurus. If you notice a trail of oil following your Ford Taurus, it may be a sign of a worn out oil pan gasket. Oil leakage can keep the engine from functioning as it should, and if the problem isn't repaired, it can shorten the life of the car. Here's how to change the oil pan gasket in Ford Taurus models made before 2007.

Put the car in park and set the parking brake. Raise the front of the car with a jack, and support it with a jack stand. Put a block in front of the rear wheel to be sure the car doesn't roll. Disconnect the negative battery cable before proceeding.

Remove the oil dipstick tube, low oil level sensor, oxygen sensor connectors, dual converter Y-pipe and engine rear plate.

Loosen the bolts holding the oil pan one at a time, and carefully remove the oil pan. You may have to use a mallet and a screwdriver to loosen the oil pan, but work slowly so you don't scrape the surface.

Carefully scrape off the old gasket. Clean the sealing surface of the oil pan with a paper towel or clean cloth dipped in solvent, being sure that the surface is perfectly clean.

Apply a small amount of clean oil to the sealing surface and put on the new gasket. Reattach the oil pan and torque the bolts according to specifications. Reconnect the engine components in the reverse order listed.

Lower the car with the jack, and remove the jack stand. Reconnect the negative battery cable.

Replace the oil with 4.5 quarts of oil, then check the level with a dipstick to be sure it's at the fill line. Add more oil if necessary. Your Ford Taurus will require between 4.5 and 5 quarts of oil.

Take the old oil to a garage or a hazardous waste facility for proper disposal.

Tips

It's a good idea to slide a piece of cardboard or a layer of newspapers under the car to protect to floor. Always wear gloves and protective clothing when changing the gasket on an oil pan. The oil isn't only messy, but it can be very hot.

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