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How to Change the Oil in a Ford V10

by John Walker; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • 7 quarts of oil (5w20 recommended)

  • Fram PH2 oil filter or equivalent

  • Socket wrench

  • Filter wrench

  • Oil drip pan

  • Funnel

  • Torque wrench

Ford V10 engines are powerful and industrial devices. With 6.8 liter fuel injection, this 10 cylinder engine has ample torque and power to pull heavy-duty jobs. As with all engines, the V10 requires routine maintenance to continue performing at optimum levels. The most important routine maintenance is the oil change. Changing your oil frequently ensures the internal portions of your engine remain lubricated and clean. Changing the oil in a Ford V10 takes about 20 minutes.

Change Your Oil

Remove the oil cap and place the oil drip pan beneath the oil pan of the engine. Using a socket wrench, loosen the oil plug located to the rear of the pan and remove. Set to the side. Make sure the oil is draining into the drip pan.

Loosen the oil filter located on the driver's side of the engine block located toward the bottom, near the front. You may have to use a filter wrench to loosen the filter.

Inspect the drain plug. If the plug looks damaged or worn or if the rubber grommet looks damaged or worn, replace with a new plug or grommet available at any auto parts store. Otherwise, reinstall the plug to finger tight.

Remove the oil filter catching any dripping oil in the drip pan. Wipe some fresh oil onto the rubber seal on the new oil filter and install to hand tight. Once tight, turn one more quarter-turn by hand to properly seat the filter. Tighten the oil plug to 15 to 20 foot pounds of torque using the torque wrench. If a torque wrench is not available, tighten using a socket wrench to firm and then one quarter-turn more.

Fill the engine up with seven quarts of 5w20 oil, using the funnel to avoid spilling. Once full, replace the cap and start the vehicle. Look at the oil plug and oil filter after the vehicle has ran for about two full minutes. Inspect the two locations for signs of leaks.

About the Author

This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Runs, contact us.

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  • chrome engine image by Thomas Czeizinger from Fotolia.com