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How to Add Horsepower to the 350Z

by Scott Eilers; Updated November 07, 2017

The 350Z is a two-door sports car produced by Nissan from 2002 to 2009 before being succeeded by the 370Z in 2010. The 350Z was offered with a 3.5L V6 engine that made between 250 and 315 horsepower depending on the year and trim line of the car. All versions of the 350Z have a substantial number of performance aftermarket upgrades which increase the horsepower and the performance of the car when installed properly.

Increase airflow into the engine. The amount of horsepower an engine produces is directly related to the amount of airflow allowed into and out of the engine, as the air mixes with the fuel. There are several performance upgrades that enhance the flow of air into the 350Z engine. The simplest and most inexpensive is to replace the factory cold-air intake with a performance aftermarket intake. For those looking for larger gains in horsepower, there are supercharger and turbocharger kits available for the 350Z that will provide a massive boost in power.

Increase airflow out of the engine. The rate at which air leaves the engine is nearly as important as the rate at which air enters the engine when considering the overall horsepower of a vehicle. Replacing the stock exhaust, headers and mufflers of the 350Z with wider, more free-flowing aftermarket parts will increase the overall horsepower of the vehicle and also give it a louder, more aggressive sound.

Reduce the weight of the engine. Horsepower is also directly related to the speed at which an engine revs, and lighter engines can rev more quickly. Many parts of the 350Z engine, such as the pistons, can be replaced with aftermarket parts made of lightweight materials which reduce the overall weight of the engine, in turn increasing rev speed and overall horsepower.

About the Author

Scott Eilers began writing professionally in 2006. He has been published as a coauthor in "Measurement in Counseling and Development" and "The Journal of Counseling and Development." He holds a Master of Arts in clinical psychology from the University of Northern Iowa and is currently pursuing a Doctor of Science in clinical psychology from Argosy University.

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