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Ford 641 Workmaster Specs

by Amanda Gronot

Replacing the Ford 640, the 641 was an agricultural tractor that Ford produced between 1957 and 1962 in Highland Park, Michigan. It was also available as an orchard tractor, the 641-21. This tractor was part of Ford's 601 Workmaster series, a lineup of tractors that are used for mowing, baling, moving and loading. The Ford 641 cost around $3,000 when it was released.

Dimensions and Capacity

With a 13-gallon fuel tank and a two-gallon hydraulic system, the 641 had an operating weight of 3,291 pounds. Its ballasted weight, or its weight with added wheel slip control, was 5,523 pounds.

In the front, the 641 used 5.50-16 tires, and in the rear, it used 11-28 tires. The front tread of this tractor ranged from 52 to 80 inches, and its rear tread ranged from 52 to 76 inches.

Chassis

The 641 offered two-wheel drive and manual steering. Power assist was optional. Its cab was open to the elements, and it used differential mechanical expanding shoe brakes.

The maximum belt power was 33.65 horsepower, and the maximum belt fuel use was 3.4 gallons per hour. The maximum drawbar power was 29.82 horsepower, and its maximum drawbar pull was 4,101 pounds.

Engine

Two different types of engines sat inside the Ford 641: a 2.2L gasoline engine and a 2.4L diesel engine. The first, a four-cylinder inline engine, produced 48.4 horsepower and 126.8 foot-pounds of torque. This motor had a liquid cooling system and a compression ratio of 7.5 to 1. Its bore was 3.43 inches, and its stroke was 3.6 inches.

The second engine, a four-cylinder, vertical inline diesel, had a compression ratio of 16.8 to 1. Its bore was 3.56 inches and its stroke was 3.6 inches. It produced the same amount of horsepower and torque.

Transmission

The 641 used a dry-disc clutch. Its four-speed transmission had unsynchronized gears--either four forward gears and one reverse gear, or 12 forward gears and three reverse gears, which added a mechanical over/under to the basic four-speed.

About the Author

In 2008 Amanda Gronot began her professional career as a writer for a research company. She helped ghostwrite a book for a prominent CEO and has had essays and translations published in the prestigious classics journal "Helicon." Gronot graduated with a four-year Master of Arts/Bachelor of Arts in classics from Yale University.

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