Chrysler Crossfire History

by Rob Wagner

The Chrysler Crossfire is a result of the now-defunct partnership of DaimlerChrysler to produce a two-seater sports car to rival the Mercedes-Benz SLK series and other German high-performance roadsters. In fact, the Crossfire possesses many Daimler-Benz (Mercedes) components, including an SLK frame. But its hybrid pedigree made it a hard sell in Europe where the Chrysler name is not valued, and in North America where Chrysler loyalists snubbed its German construction.

The Beginning

The 2006 Chrysler Crossfire coupe.

The Crossfire was designed by Eric Stoddard in 2001 and refined by Andrew Dyson before debuting in 2003.

The Name

The 2008 Crossfire roadster was the last model year.

The name Crossfire represents the collaboration between Chrysler and Daimler-Benz, with 60 percent of its components Chrysler parts, and 40 percent Mercedes.

Production

The SRT-6 was the high-performance Crossfire model.

The sports car was introduced in 2003 for the 2004 model year and ended production in 2007, with the supercharged SRT-6 and roadster versions debuting in 2005.

Models

The unique rear view of the Crossfire (this is a 2008 model, the final model year)

The coupe and roadster were offered in three trim packages: Base, Limited and the supercharged SRT-6 versions.

SRT-6

Compact interior of the Crossfire.

The top-of-the-line SRT-6 was equipped with a supercharged 3.2-liter V-6 engine generating 330 horsepower and a 0-60 mph speed of 4.8 seconds.

Sales

The sturdy V-6 engine in a 2004 Crossfire

Sales in 2003 were 35,700 units, but fell to 28,000 in 2004, and eventually to only 2,000 in 2007.

About the Author

Rob Wagner is a journalist with over 35 years experience reporting and editing for newspapers and magazines. His experience ranges from legal affairs reporting to covering the Middle East. He served stints as a newspaper and magazine editor in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Wagner attended California State University, Los Angeles, and has a degree in journalism.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Chrysler LLC