How to Calculate Annual Mileage

by Adrian Grahams

Whether it's for an auto insurance quote or a lease mileage allowance, knowing your annual car mileage is useful information. Fortunately, you don't need to be a math wizard to calculate annual mileage. The key is to monitor miles over a short period of time and then use this data to accurately estimate your mileage for the whole year.

Set your car's odometer to zero with the reset button on the dash instrument display. One week later, make a note of the mileage. Multiply the weekly mileage figure by 52 to give annual mileage. Make sure you choose a week that is representative of your normal driving routine. Add 5 percent to the annual mileage figure to cover unplanned trips and as an error margin. To calculate this, first multiply the annual mileage by 5. Divide this figure by 100. This will give 5 percent of the annual mileage. Add this figure to the original annual mileage.

Use an online route planning or driving directions tool to calculate the distance you drive each week. Try to include all journeys. This method allows you to work out your annual mileage in situations where you do not have time to monitor actual mileage over a short period of time. Multiply this figure by 52 to give annual mileage. Again, add 5 percent as a margin for error.

Check your vehicle's service history records, which often record mileage at the time of each service. Work out the annual mileage figure by comparing service dates with recorded mileage. If you live in the United Kingdom and drive a car more than three years old, consult your last two annual Ministry of Transport, or MOT, Test certificates. MOT certificates record annual mileage, so this will give you an accurate historic figure.

Tip

  • check If you're planning any longer trips, maybe for a vacation or to visit a distant relative, add this mileage to your annual estimated figure.

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About the Author

Adrian Grahams began writing professionally in 1989 after training as a newspaper reporter. His work has been published online and in various newspapers, including "The Cornish Times" and "The Sunday Independent." Grahams specializes in technology and communications. He holds a Bachelor of Science, postgraduate diplomas in journalism and website design and is studying for an MBA.

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