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How to Get Better Gas Mileage in a Honda Fit

by Jerel Jacobs

The Honda Fit is capable of getting excellent fuel economy both on the highway and in the city. However, even the Fit, there are things you can do to maximize your miles per gallon. When it comes to fuel economy, little things add up, so make sure that you are considering how your driving style and maintenance patterns affect your gas mileage.

Avoid hard acceleration. Do not unnecessarily mash the gas pedal. Smooth acceleration will improve gas mileage considerably.

Don't speed. Driving faster will cause the engine in your Honda Fit to work harder and noticeably decrease your gas mileage. Driving at the speed limit will ensure that you are attaining the maximum possible fuel economy. To increase cruising range, use the cruise control.

Check your tire pressure once a month, under normal driving conditions. If you drive on extremely rough roads, consider increasing the frequency to once every two weeks. Driving on under inflated tires will decrease your fuel economy by up to ten percent.

Make sure that your Honda is serviced at the requested times. Instead of mandating specific times, the Honda Fit features a "Maintenance Minder" computer that tells you when to perform oil changes and other basic services, using sensors that determine the condition of the engine oil and air filter, among other items. For other scheduled services, have your Fit serviced at the mileage intervals indicated in your owner's manual for your specific model. By keeping your Honda tuned and changing the oil and filter when needed you will ensure that its engine is operating with maximum efficiency and returning the highest possible miles per gallon.

Avoid carrying unnecessary weight. In a car with a hatchback design such as the Honda Fit, it is tempting to carry a lot of unnecessary items with you. However, even though individual items may weigh relatively little, the combined weight of a lot of unnecessary items can lower fuel economy.

About the Author

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