How to Activate Satellite Radio in a Mercedes

by Aaron Zvi

Mercedes-Benz has partnered with Sirius XM Radio radio to offer Sirius satellite radio as a standard feature across a large portion of its vehicle fleet. While satellite radio is a subscription service, the radios often include a free introductory trial of several months. To receive the Sirius satellite signal, the Sirius radio needs to be activated. This can be done fairly quickly with a toll-free phone call or over the internet.

Check your owner's manual to ensure that the built-in stereo in your Mercedes-Benz vehicle is in fact capable of receiving Sirius satellite radio signals. Some built-in stereos are only "Sirius-ready," meaning that they require the purchase of a separate tuner before they can receive the satellite signal.

Retrieve and write down the unique ESN number that belongs to the Sirius radio in your dashboard. On many Mercedes-Benz models, this number can be displayed by pressing the "SAT" button on the center dashboard and then choosing "Service" on the screen. However, instructions may vary based on your car and radio model. Check your owner's manual or call the dealer.

Park your car outdoors, in a location with a clear view of the sky. Turn on the car stereo, put it into satellite mode and tune to Sirius channel 184 (the activation and notification channel).

Contact the Sirius activation center by phone at 888-539-SIRI (7474) or activate online (see Resources). Provide your radio's ESN. Normal subscriptions require payment by credit card.

Keep your car parked outside with the radio on and tuned to Sirius channel 184 for about 15 minutes after completing the telephone or online activation process. This is to ensure that your Sirius radio receives the activation signal.

Tips

  • check Activation of a Sirius radio typically costs $15.
  • check Mention or enter any Mercedes promotional codes that give you a no-charge trial subscription in addition to the radio's ESN.

Items you will need

About the Author

Aaron Zvi has been a writer and photojournalist for 10 years in Washington, D.C., and the Middle East. A student of political science and psychology from the University of Maryland, he also does technical and market analysis for a green technology company. His work has appeared in local newspapers, commissioned research and a patent or two. He began writing professionally in 1998.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera luxury car speed image by alma_sacra from Fotolia.com