How to Use Jack Stands on Miata

by Jeffrey Caldwell

The Miata is a two-seat roadster produced by Mazda from 1989 to the present. The Miata was designed as a unibody vehicle, meaning it does not have a full frame underneath it. Therefore, Miata owners must be cautious when lifting their cars and supporting them with jack stands. Lifting or placing jack stands underneath the wrong place on the vehicle can distort the car's body panels. Lifting and lowering a Miata can be accomplished by the home mechanic, but it is important to closely follow the guidelines listed in the owner's manual.

Locate the front factory recommended jacking point beneath the engine. It is at the center of the front lower brace (U-shaped) directly in front of the engine oil pan.

Place the hydraulic jack directly below the front jacking point and raise the jack to lift the front of the vehicle.

Place jack stands on each side of the front of the vehicle at the support points. These are directly below the side-view mirrors.

Slowly lower the front of the vehicle.

Locate the rear factory recommended jacking point. It is beneath the center of the rear differential.

Place a hydraulic jack directly below the rear differential. Raise the jack to lift the rear of the vehicle.

Place jack stands beneath the support points at the rear of the vehicle. These points are just ahead of the rear wheels at each side of the vehicle.

Slowly lower the rear of the vehicle.

Tip

  • check If you are planning to remove the vehicle's wheels and tires, loosen the lug nuts before lifting the wheels off the ground.

Warning

  • close Always follow the instructions listed in the vehicle owner's manual when lifting and lowering a vehicle. Failing to do so could cause injury or death.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Jeffrey Caldwell has been a freelance writer for over five months and has published over 250 articles on websites like eHow and Trails.com. Caldwell writes articles on a wide range of topics including travel, camping and automotive mechanics. He has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Millersville University.