How to Turn a Ford Ranger Into a Flat Bed

by Allen Moore

Ford Rangers are very versatile small trucks. While the standard pickup bed helps with all sorts of payload variations, there are times when having no bed walls nor a tailgate creates a more viable vehicle for your needs. Many farmers, ranchers and landscapers use flatbed Rangers to carry loads on the job. Other applications include outfitting the truck with specialized equipment and toolboxes that must remain unencumbered by the confining bed.

1

Unbolt the bed anchors from the floor of the Ranger’s bed with the socket set. These bolts run down into the frame, so removing them will take some time due to their length. The heads of these bolts are exposed and easily accessible from the inside of the bed.

2

Open the fuel door (if your Ranger has a fuel door in the side of the bed and not the cab) and unbolt the fuel filler neck flange with the socket set. Pull the flange out so that the filler neck can move out of the bed easily.

3

Grab one side of the bed while your helper grabs the other. Lift the bed up and off the Ranger’s frame and walk it straight backward until you’re clear of the frame, then set it somewhere out of the way. Make sure you don’t snag the fuel filler neck while doing so.

4

Lift the flatbed and walk it over the Ranger’s frame in reverse of how you removed the old bed. Set it in position, being mindful of the fuel filler neck. Route the filler neck into position and bolt it in place with the socket set.

5

Bolt the new flatbed to the Ranger’s frame with the socket set. You may need your helper’s aid in shifting the bed slightly to make sure the bolt holes in the bed line up precisely with the holes in the Ranger’s frame.

Tip

  • check Many off-road and RV retailers sell flatbeds for pickups. If your local ones do not, you can check with trailer manufacturers, camper shell retailers and your local Ford dealer.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Allen Moore's career includes awards in poetry and creative fiction, published lyrics, fiction books and nonfiction articles as well as a master certification in automotive service from the Ford Motor Company. Moore is a contributing writer for RF365.com and various other websites, a ghostwriter for Rainbow Writing and has over a dozen works of fiction currently in print.

Photo Credits

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