How to Secure a Steel Coil on a Flatbed Trailer

by Cody Sorensen

Steel coils can weigh tens of thousands of pounds and so securing these loads according to the standards set forth by the Department of Transportation should be a drivers first priority. According to a news report done by WXIN-TV and FOX59, Indiana State Police said that, "a steel coil wasn't properly tied down when it fell from a truck and killed three people and injured a young girl on a southern Indiana highway. Trooper Bill Flick says the semi-trailer was hauling steel coils... when it rounded a curve and a nearly 44,000-pound coil came loose from the trailer and crushed the vehicles."

Loading The Steel Coil Securely

Place two steel coil bunkers or cradles evenly centered from front to back and from side to side on the trailer. Position the steel coil with its eye facing crosswise on the flatbed trailer. Throw two chains over or through each end of the coil cradle or bunker and hook the ends of the chain to the guard rails on each side of the trailer. Attach four chain binders, two per chain, on each side of the bunker or cradle and tighten them down with a chain binder pry bar.

Explain to the coil lift operator where and how you want the coil placed on the flatbed trailer. Direct the lift operator while the coil is being lowered into the cradle or bunker previously placed on the trailer.

Instruct the coil lift operator to reposition the coil if it is not perfectly center on the trailer from front to back. Allow the coil to be completely lowered onto the flatbed before attempting to secure the coil to the bed.

Securing the Steel Coil to the Flatbed

Hook the end hook of a chain to the guard rail of the trailer, restricting forward motion, and throw the entire length of the chain through the eye of the coil. Hook the other hook end of the chain to the guard rail of the trailer also restricting forward motion.

Hook the end hook of a chain to the guard rail of the trailer, restricting rearward motion, and throw the entire length of the chain through the eye of the coil. Hook the other hook end of the chain to the guard rail of the trailer also restricting rearward motion.

Place steel chain binders on each side of all four chains and bind them down. If the total coil weight is more than the maximum load limit of the two chains combined, add chains in this manner until the strength of the combined chains equals a number greater than the weight of the coil. Alternate the chains to continually pull against one another to prevent rearward and forward motion.

Items you will need

About the Author

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