How to Replace a 2005 Town & Country Oxygen Sensor

by Johnathan Cronk

The 2005 Town & Country is a minivan manufactured and sold by Chrysler. The 2005 Town & Country came with either a 3.3L V6 engine or a 3.8L V6 engine and a four-speed automatic transmission. The minivan has an oxygen sensor installed under the hood to measure the amount of oxygen entering the V6 engine at any given time. The sensor relays this information to ensure the correct air to fuel ratio is achieved. When the oxygen sensor within your Town & Country fails, your "Check Engine" light will appear. Replacing the oxygen sensor can be done without the help of a mechanic using minimal tools.

Park the Town & Country on a level surface. Turn the engine off and allow ample time for components to cool.

Open the hood of the minivan and locate the bad oxygen sensor. The oxygen sensor is installed on driver side of the exhaust manifold. The oxygen sensor is a plug-type cylinder. You can identify the sensor by the three wires coming out of the top of it. If needed, the Town & Country repair manual will have a detailed diagram.

Unplug the wire harness from the oxygen sensor. The wire harness will disengage when gently pulled. Place the wire harness to the side.

Loosen the oxygen sensor from the exhaust manifold using a socket wrench along with a specialized oxygen sensor socket. If you do not have an oxygen sensor socket, you can purchase one at your local auto part store. Twist the wrench counterclockwise until the oxygen sensor is loose and can be easily removed. Pull the oxygen sensor out of the exhaust manifold and discard.

Align the replacement oxygen sensor on the exhaust manifold. Begin to twist the oxygen sensor into place with your fingers to get it properly in place. Continue to tighten the sensor with the socket wrench. Connect the wire harness onto the replacement sensor. The oxygen sensor is now replaced and ready for use. Close the hood of the Town & Country.

Items you will need

About the Author

Johnathan Cronk is a freelance writer and began writing at the age of 18. Throughout his career he has specialized in sports, how-to and advice articles. He has also written sales pitches in the corporate setting since 2001. He studied business at Hudson Valley Community College before transferring to the State University of New York, Albany.

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