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How to Replace a Starter Motor on a Ford Falcon

by John Stevens J.D.

When the Ford Falcon's ignition switch is turned, an electrical signal is sent to a switch, called a solenoid. The solenoid routes that signal to the starter motor via a single cable. A gear within the starter motor exits the body of the starter and intermeshes with the engine's flywheel. When the ignition key is released, the solenoid turns the signal off, and the starter disengages with the flywheel. The starter is defective if it fails to push its gear into the flywheel or if its gear is worn and cannot turn the flywheel.

Raise the front of the car with a hoist and support its weight with safety stands.

Remove the starter solenoid cable from the starter motor. The starter solenoid is bolted to the passenger's side of the engine compartment, next to the battery. The solenoid's cable can be traced to a threaded stud on the side of the starter motor. The tip of the cable features a metal eyelet, which slides onto the threaded stud and is held in place with a single nut. Remove the nut with a wrench then pull the cable off of the threaded rod.

Remove the starter from the transmission. The starter motor attaches to the transmission's bell housing with two bolts. Remove the upper bolt first with a wrench. Grasp the bottom of the starter to hold it in place then remove the bottom bolt. Lower the starter out of the transmission.

Position a new rubber dust ring onto the face of the starter, where the starter mounts to the bell housing if applicable. Falcons produced in 1962 and 1963 featured a rubber dust ring to help seal the seam between the starter and the transmission. Later models did not use the dust ring. Note that one side of the dusk ring is flared. The flared side must face the starter motor.

Insert the starter motor into the transmission's bell housing then install the starter's two bolts with a torque wrench. Each bolt must be tightened to between 12 and 15 foot-pounds of torque. Overtightening the bolts can damage the bell housing.

Slide the metal eyelet on the tip of the starter solenoid cable onto the threaded rod on the side of the starter then tighten the cable's nut onto the eyelet with a wrench.

Raise the car with the hoist and remove the safety stands, then lower the car to the ground.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

John Stevens has been a writer for various websites since 2008. He holds an Associate of Science in administration of justice from Riverside Community College, a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice from California State University, San Bernardino, and a Juris Doctor from Whittier Law School. Stevens is a lawyer and licensed real-estate broker.

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