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How to Replace the Voltage Regulator in a Yamaha V Star 1100

by Chris Gilliland

Just about every V-Star 1100 owner loves the sound of their motorcycle roaring to life when they press the starter button. But if all you hear is a clicking sound, chances are that your V-Star's voltage regulator has gone bad. Sometimes you may even be able to start your V-Star, only to have it die a few miles down the road. Either way, the old regulator needs to be replaced. Relax. The job is not as difficult as it sounds, since the regulator is housed behind your V-Star's frame cover. Within a few minutes, you'll be back on the road.

Insert your V-Star 1100's key into the lock built into the left frame cover, below the rider's saddle. Unlock the cover, then pull it away from the frame to access the battery compartment and the voltage regulator.

Unscrew the terminal bolt from the battery's negative terminal, indicated by a minus (-) symbol, using a Phillips screwdriver. Pull the black negative battery cable away from the battery.

Unscrew the voltage regulator's mounting bolts, located next to the battery along the frame rails, using a 10 mm socket attached to a socket wrench. Pull the regulator off of the frame and unplug it from your V-Star's wiring harness.

Plug a new voltage regulator into the wiring harness, then bolt it into place on the frame with a 10 mm socket.

Reconnect the black negative cable to the battery's negative terminal. Tighten the terminal's bolt with a Phillips screwdriver.

Place the left frame cover against the motorcycle and lock it in place with your V-Star's key.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

An avid motorcyclist, Chris Gilliland has immersed himself into the two-wheeled world while balancing work life and raising three daughters. When he is not managing the parts department of a local, multi-line motorcycle dealership, Gilliland can often be found riding, writing or working on his motorcycle blog, Wingman's Garage.

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