How to Replace a Motorcycle Gas Tank

by Chris Gilliland

A damaged gas tank can quickly become a safety hazard, allowing flammable gasoline to leak onto the rider and heated components. Whether the damage is caused by a crash or from internal corrosion, replacing the gas tank immediately can avert serious consequences. In most cases, the gas tank can be removed using common hand tools, but the procedure will differ slightly between older or cruiser-style motorcycles and modern sport motorcycles. Allow a minimum of 30 minutes to replace the gas tank safely.

Sport Motorcycles

Unscrew the rider's seat bolts with an Allen wrench or use the seat release mechanism to remove the seat.

Remove the pair of bolts on the upper half of the gas tank, near the handlebars, with the Allen wrench.

Remove the pivot bolt from the gas tank's base, near the seat rails, with a socket wrench.

Lift the gas tank slightly and pull the fuel line off of the fuel valve or pump on the left side of the tank.

Pull the gas tank off of the motorcycle.

Install the new gas tank following the reverse order of removal.

Cruiser Models and Older Motorcycles

Unscrew the rider's seat bolts with an Allen wrench or use the seat release mechanism to remove the seat.

Remove the bolts from the gas tank's base with a socket wrench.

Lift the rear of the gas tank upward. Pull the entire gas tank towards the rear of the motorcycle until the tank is free from the mounting bosses on the motorcycle's frame.

Pull the fuel line off of the fuel valve on the left side of the gas tank.

Install the new gas tank following the reverse order of removal.

Warning

  • close Do not perform this task on a hot or warmed-up motorcycle. Fuel droplets can ignite on the motorcycle's exhaust or motor, leading to serious injury and physical damage. Also, avoid open flames while performing this repair.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

An avid motorcyclist, Chris Gilliland has immersed himself into the two-wheeled world while balancing work life and raising three daughters. When he is not managing the parts department of a local, multi-line motorcycle dealership, Gilliland can often be found riding, writing or working on his motorcycle blog, Wingman's Garage.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera vintage motorcycle image by sasha from Fotolia.com