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How to Replace Headlights in a 1998 Chevy Silverado

by Christian Killian

The 1998 Chevy Silverado’s 2-bulb headlight system, uses a 9006 halogen bulb for the low beam and a 9005 halogen bulb for the high beam. The bulbs are located in a composite headlight assembly with the high beam bulb being the inboard bulb in the assembly. If your Silverado has a high and low beam out, replacement of both bulbs is required. You should always replace the bulbs in pairs, ensuring the light coming from the headlights is balanced and even.

1

Open the hood of your Silverado and locate the retaining pins on the radiator support right behind the headlight assembly. Turn the outer pin outward and the inner pin inward then pull them both up and remove them.

2

Grasp the headlight assembly on either side then slide it forward, removing it from the truck. Release the locking tab on the electrical connector and pull it off the bulb socket. Turn the bulb and socket counterclockwise then pull it straight out of the headlight housing.

3

Insert a new bulb and socket into the headlight assembly then turn it clockwise to lock it in place. Push the electrical connector onto the bulb socket until the locking tab engages. Repeat the steps for the second bulb if you are changing both high and low beam bulbs.

4

Slide the headlight assembly back into the front of the truck then install the locking pins into the radiator support. Push them down into the headlight assembly and turn the pins to lock them in place. Turn the outer pin inward, and the inner pin outward.

5

Move to the opposite side of the truck and repeat the process to change the bulbs in the second headlight assembly. Turn the headlights on to verify that they are working correctly.

Warning

  • Be careful not to handle the glass portion of the halogen bulbs while you are replacing them. The glass is sensitive and the oils from your finders are enough to cause the bulb to overheat and fail.

References

About the Author

Christian Killian has been a freelance journalist/photojournalist since 2006. After many years of working in auto parts and service positions, Killian decided to move into journalism full-time. He has been published in "1st Responder News" as well as in other trade magazines and newspapers in the last few years.

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