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How to Remove a Tundra Overhead Console

by Leonardo R. Grabkowski

Late-model Tundra pickup trucks are equipped with an interior overhead console. This console is mounted on the headliner, in between the two sun visors. It includes a sunglasses holder, a business-card holder and a dome light. If you plan to make interior modifications, such as installing a backup camera system or a headliner-mounted DVD player, you might need to remove the overhead console to complete the installation. With the right tools, the procedure can be completed in about 15 minutes.

Step 1

Disconnect the negative cable from the battery with a pair of pliers before beginning. The overhead console has an electrical harness attached. Disconnecting the negative battery cable ensures your safety.

Step 2

Pry off each corner of the dome light lens with a plastic or nylon trim removal tool. Insert the tool into the small slots in each corner. Pull the dome light lens down to remove it.

Step 3

Bend back the metal tabs behind the dome-light lens. Use a small flat head screwdriver or a straight pick tool. Behind the tabs, you'll see two screws. Remove the two screws with a T-20 Torx screwdriver.

Step 4

Open the two compartments closest to the windshield (the business card holder and sunglasses holder). Inside each compartment, you'll find two T-20 screws. Remove them with the T-20 Torx screwdriver.

Grasp the rear part of the overhead console. Pull it down a few inches, and then push it forward to unhook the front clips. Lower the overhead console a few more inches. Unplug the wiring harness attached to it to remove it from the Tundra.

Items you will need

  • Pliers
  • Plastic or nylon trim tool
  • Straight pick or flat head screwdriver
  • T-20 Torx screwdriver

About the Author

Leonardo R. Grabkowski has been writing professionally for more than four years. Grabkowski attended college in Oregon. He builds websites on the side and has a slight obsession with Drupal, Joomla and Wordpress.

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