How to Remove Torque Converter Bolts

by Don Bowman

Depending on the vehicle, there are two ways to access the bolts for the torque converter. There will either be a cover or plate at the bottom of the bellhousing that conceals the converter, or you will need remove the starter to gain access to the bolts. It is simple to establish whether there is a cover by looking at the bellhousing just behind the rear of the oil pan. It may be a small flat plate or a larger section rounded like the bellhousing. The engine must be turned to rotate the torque converter to access all the bolts one at a time.

Establish whether there is a cover on the bellhousing for use in accessing the torque converter. Disconnect the negative terminal on the battery, using a wrench, if there is no cover. Raise and support the vehicle on jack stands.

Remove the access panel if there is one, using the 3/8-inch drive socket. If there is no panel, remove the starter using the 3/8-inch drive socket. Disconnect the electrical wires using a wrench, then lay the starter out of the way.

Place a 1/2-inch drive socket of the appropriate size on the crankshaft pulley bolt.

Remove the torque converter bolts one at a time with a 3/8-inch drive socket and ratchet. After removing one bolt, turn the crankshaft in the normal direction of rotation until the next bolt appears in the window of accessibility. Continue to turn the crankshaft until all three or four bolts are removed. Most vehicles use four bolts, but some have only three. When all are removed, the torque converter can be moved rearward.

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About the Author

Don Bowman has been writing for various websites and several online magazines since 2008. He has owned an auto service facility since 1982 and has over 45 years of technical experience as a master ASE tech. Bowman has a business degree from Pennsylvania State University and was an officer in the U.S. Army (aircraft maintenance officer, pilot, six Air Medal awards, two tours Vietnam).