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How to Replace a Starter in a Chevy Monte Carlo

by Jeffrey Caldwell

The Monte Carlo is a midsize luxury coupe, produced by Chevrolet from 1970 to 2007. Models built from 1970 to 1988 were rear wheel drive vehicles, based on General Motors A-body platform. Models built from 1995 to 2007 were front wheel drive vehicles. The starter motor on a Monte Carlo is a small electric motor mounted to the engine block. When the ignition switch is engaged a small gear attached to the starter turns the transmission flexplate, which spins the engine's crankshaft and pistons, starting the vehicle.

Removing a Starter

Disconnect the ground cable from the negative battery terminal, by loosening the retaining bolt and pulling the clamp off the negative terminal.

Raise the vehicle according to instructions in the owner's manual and support it with jack stands placed underneath the frame.

Locate the starter motor. It will be bolted to the underside of the engine block near where the engine mates with the transmission.

Label and disconnect the wires attached to the starter solenoid.

Remove the two bolts that secure the starter to the engine block.

Remove the starter from the vehicle.

Installing a Starter

Lift the starter into position alongside the engine block.

Reinstall the two bolts that secure the starter to the engine block.

Reconnect the wiring harness to the starter solenoid using the labels you made during disassembly.

Lower the vehicle.

Reconnect the ground cable to the negative battery terminal by sliding the clamp over the terminal and tightening the retaining bolt.

Tip

  • When removing and installing the starter, you must fully support the weight of the starter at all times. Allowing the starter to hang from the starter bolts while they are loose can cause damage to the bolts or threads in the engine block, especially on newer models with aluminum engine blocks.

Warning

  • Always follow the instructions listed in the owner's manual when lifting or lowering a vehicle. Failure to do so could cause injury or death.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Jeffrey Caldwell has been a freelance writer for over five months and has published over 250 articles on websites like eHow and Trails.com. Caldwell writes articles on a wide range of topics including travel, camping and automotive mechanics. He has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Millersville University.

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