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How to Remove an Engine From a Honda Accord

by Gregory Taylor

The engine of a Honda Accord may burn out or lock up as the result of wear and tear or neglect. If this happens to the engine in your Accord, don't be too quick to sell the car. You can remove the engine and replace it with a new one, giving your Honda a new lease on life. Removing the Honda Accord engine is not a complex task and can be done in your garage using basic tools.

Remove the bolts holding the hood of the Accord in place using a wrench. Remove the hood and set it aside. Disconnect the negative cable from the car battery by loosening the terminal nut with a wrench and pulling the cable off the battery. Ensure the negative terminal does not touch the car body or any other metal parts.

Place a bucket under the radiator, unscrew the drain plug at the bottom of the radiator and drain out all the coolant into the bucket. Unscrew the clamps on the radiator hose using a Phillips screwdriver and then disconnect the radiator hose from the radiator. Unscrew and remove the fan. Pull the intake hose out of the engine housing.

Slide a bucket under the car and position it under the power steering pump. Loosen the nuts of the power steering hose using a wrench. Remove the bolts. Secure the hose under the firewall and remove the power steering pump. Use a wrench to remove the bolts on the air compressor and remove the compressor.

Raise the front end of the Honda Accord with a hydraulic jack. Position jack stands under the frame and lower the car onto the stands. Use the ratchet set to remove the transmission bolts. Slide the jack under the engine and jack it up just enough to lift the engine slightly and take its weight off the motor mounts. Remove the motor mount bolts using a wrench and ratchet. Pull off the motor mounts with your hands.

With the engine hoist in front of the car, connect the hoist chain to the engine's motor mount fixtures. Lift the engine out of the car.

Items you will need

About the Author

Based out of Pittsburgh, Gregory Taylor has been writing since 1999. He has written for the "Sentry," RMU Radio and the "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette." Taylor holds a Master of Arts in journalism and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Robert Morris University.

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