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How to Remove a Brake Rotor from a Celica

by Gregory Crews

The Toyota Celica uses a hub assembly with sealed bearings to ensure that the wheels move freely as the car is being driven. The rotor is mounted between the caliper and the hub assembly. The rotor is the smooth flat surface against which the calipers press to slow and stop the Celica. Once you take the wheel off, the rotor will be exposed, and removing the rotor will be easy.

Park the car on a level surface. Set the emergency brake and chock the back wheels. This will prevent the car from rolling backward once you raise it.

Loosen the lug nuts on the left front wheel but do not remove them.

Place a jack under the front cross-member of the Celica. Raise the car high enough to place jack stands under the cross-member. Lower the car onto the jack stands.

Remove the lug nuts from the wheel assembly. Pull the tire off the assembly and place it to the side.

Unbolt the caliper with a socket wrench. The caliper has two bolts in the back of it that keep it secured over the rotor. Lift the caliper off the rotor and place it in the shock tower behind the rotor. This will prevent the caliper from hanging from the brake line.

Tap the rotor with a hammer. Pull it off the wheel assembly by hand once it is loosened.

Warning

  • Working under the car can be dangerous if it is not secured properly. Always chock the back wheels to prevent the car from rolling backward; chock the front wheels when working on the back wheels.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Gregory Crews has been in the film industry for three years and has appeared in more than 38 major motion pictures and 16 television shows. He also writes detailed automotive tutorials. His expertise in the automotive industry has given him the skills to write detailed technical instructional articles.

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