Information on Towing Trailers for the Chrysler Town & Country

by Rachel Steffan

The Chrysler Town & Country comes with an optional Towing Prep Package that allows the minivan to tow up to 3,600 lbs. when equipped with the largest available engine. The Towing Prep Package includes a trailer wiring harness, better engine cooling and upgraded load-leveling suspension. Chrysler offers the towing package on the Touring and Limited models.

Engine Size and Towing Capacity

The Chrysler Town & Country LX does not have the Towing Prep Package option, but its 3.3-liter engine can safely tow 1,600 lbs. Without the Towing Prep Package, the 3.8-liter Touring model can also tow 1,600 lbs., but that capacity increases to 3,600 lbs. with the towing package. These numbers remain the same for the 4-liter Limited model: 1,600 lbs. without the towing package and 3,600 lbs. with the towing package.

Load-Leveling Suspension

Engine size is not the only factor dictating a vehicle's towing capacity. Inadequate suspension renders a vehicle unstable with the added weight of the trailer tongue pressing down on the rear of the frame. Less weight on the front wheels affects the steering, acceleration and traction in front-wheel-drive vehicles such as the Town & Country. The load-leveling suspension in the towing package distributes the weight of the vehicle and trailer more evenly among the four wheels.

Hitch Receivers

The Chrysler Town & Country comes with an available Mopar hitch receiver rated for 2,000 lbs. You can also buy a heavier Mopar hitch receiver from Chrysler, rated for 3,600 lbs, for $334 (as of December 2010). Alternatively, you can have an aftermarket hitch receiver installed by an independent mechanic. You must buy an appropriately rated ball mount and hitch ball separately; most vehicle owners can install these components easily at home.

Safe Towing

Most trailers have the gross trailer weight printed on a small plaque on the trailer frame. Do not exceed the rating of your Town & Country model, and remember to account for additional weight added to the trailer when it's loaded. Always drive conservatively when hauling a trailer, as the added weight will increase the car's braking distance and compromise its handling ability.

About the Author

Based in central Missouri, Rachel Steffan has been writing since 2005. She has contributed to several online publications, specializing in sustainable agriculture, food, health and nutrition. Steffan holds a Bachelor of Science in agriculture from Truman State University.