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How to Replace a Fuel Pump on a Miata

by Shayrgo Barazi; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Flat head screwdriver

  • Phillips head screwdriver

  • Drain pan

  • Replacement fuel pump

The fuel pump on your Mazda Miata is an electrical motor that sends fuel from the fuel tank to the fuel injectors. The fuel pump can die out at some point in its life, leaving your car inoperable. Personally replacing the fuel pump can save you hundreds of dollars rather than taking the car in for repairs at an automotive facility.

Pull back the rear carpeting located directly below the convertible top. The carpet is held on by plastic clips that will have to be pried out with a flat head screwdriver.

Remove the four screws holding the fuel pump cover down with a Phillips head screwdriver.

Remove the electrical connectors attached to the fuel pump assembly.

Crank the vehicle two or three times for approximately five seconds to relieve fuel system pressure so that fuel doesn’t splash around.

Remove the fuel lines from the fuel pump assembly by removing the hose clamps with a screwdriver. Then pull the fuel lines out of the assembly.

Remove the screws holding the fuel pump assembly in place with a screwdriver.

Remove the fuel pump and immediately place it in a bucket inside the vehicle so that fuel doesn’t drip on the interior carpeting.

Remove the fuel pump from its assembly and replace with the new fuel pump.

Place the fuel pump assembly back in the fuel pump and tighten all screws with a screwdriver.

Re-connect the electrical connectors and fuel lines.

Install the fuel pump cover by tightening the screws with a screwdriver.

Put the carpet back into place and push in the plastic retainers to hold the carpet down.

Tips

Place old rags next to the fuel pump cover so that fuel doesn't drip onto the carpeting while you are transferring the fuel pump to the drain pan.

Warnings

Wear safety glasses when working on your Miata.

References

About the Author

Shayrgo Barazi is a college graduate with a degree in automotive engineering technology (B.S.c.) from Ferris State University. He is a successful writer and has taken a college level technical writing course. He currently works for Time Wave Media writing automotive DIY articles. He has an intuition for technology and has the capacity to write, too.

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