How to Remove a Radio From Dodge Cars

by Contributing Writer; Updated June 12, 2017

The Dodge car is a front-wheel-drive, full-sized sedan (now out of production). The factory-installed radio was sufficient enough for a mass audience. However, every year aftermarket companies specializing in audio equipment create new and more powerful radios and head units that are a direct replacement for the factory radio. Since the factory radio can be replaced, you can do this upgrade at home in your driveway, but you'll need to know how to first remove the stock radio.

Under The Hood:

 How to Remove a Radio From a 2002 Dodge Durango

Lower the column gearshift selector to neutral and set the parking brake pedal. Open the hood and disconnect the negative battery cable (--) with the pliers to prevent shock. Wait 10 minutes for the power reserve to discharge (you'll be working near the steering column and airbag).

Remove the two 7 mm bolt-screws from the odometer cluster hood using a ratchet or a Phillips screwdriver.

Remove the three Torx screws (T-20) from the lower steering column panel. Pull the panel off when the screws are out. Remove the three Torx screws (T-20) from the lower dash panel beneath the steering column, and then pull off this panel.

Grasp the entire front dash panel (it extends from the left edge of the dash to the radio) and pull sharply. The panel is held in place by three clips. If necessary, start above the steering wheel and work your way down to the radio. Pull the front dash panel out and to the right.

Reach behind the front dash panel and unplug the electrical connections (A/C control panel). Maneuver the panel toward the passenger side of the Durango, and then lift it up and over the steering column to access the radio.

Unscrew the four Phillips screws that mount the radio. Carefully slide the radio out and unplug the wiring harness and antenna cable behind it.

Items you will need

  • Pliers

  • Torx screwdriver (T-20)

  • Phillips screwdriver

  • Ratchet (optional)

 How to Remove the Radio from a Dodge Caravan

Pull out the storage slot in the middle of the dash by hand. Pull out the cupholder which snaps into place.

Remove the two screws under the storage slot removed in Step 1 with a Phillips head screwdriver. These are the two bottom mounting screws for the radio.

Unsnap the decorative panel and set it aside.

Unscrew the top bolts holding the radio in place.

Pull the radio out of the slot to access the wiring in the back. Disconnect the wiring harness by pulling the locking tabs out and pulling it away from the radio.

Pull the antenna wire out of the back of the radio. Place the radio to the side.

Items you will need

  • Phillips head screwdriver

 How to Remove the Radio in a Dodge Intrepid

Disconnect the cable to the negative battery terminal. Turn the retaining nut counterclockwise on the cable clamp to loosen and slide the clamp off the terminal.

Remove the ashtray/coin holder.

Reach behind the area where the ashtray/coin holder used to be and pull the center dash trim off. It is held in place with pressure clips, so pulling it straight off will remove the trim.

Remove the four screws holding the radio in place. Make sure to put them in a safe place, as you will need to put them back when you are done installing the new radio.

Pull the radio out of the dash.

Unplug the electrical connection and antenna.

Items you will need

  • Philips Head Screwdriver

  • Socket Wrench with Socket Set

 How to Remove the Radio in a Dodge Dakota

Locate the two screws directly above the gauge cluster, with the head of the screw pointing downwards. Remove the screws using the Phillips-head screwdriver.

Pull the bezel around the gauge cluster and the radio off the dashboard to release the clips holding it in place. Work from the left side of the bezel to the right, then remove the bezel from the truck.

Unscrew the radio from the dashboard. Pull the stereo out of the dashboard and unplug the wiring harness on the back side. Remove the radio from the truck.

Items you will need

  • Phillips-head screwdriver

About the Author

This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Runs, contact us.